How it Began

Here is a snippet of the Globe & Mail article that describes how Pink Shirt Day began:

"David Shepherd, Travis Price and their teenage friends organized a high-school protest to wear pink in sympathy with a Grade 9 boy who was being bullied [for wearing a pink shirt]...[They] took a stand against bullying when they protested against the harassment of a new Grade 9 student by distributing pink T-shirts to all the boys in their school.

'I learned that two people can come up with an idea, run with it, and it can do wonders,' says Mr. Price, 17, who organized the pink protest. ‘Finally, someone stood up for a weaker kid.’

So Mr. Shepherd and some other headed off to a discount store and bought 50 pink tank tops. They sent out message to schoolmates that night, and the next morning they hauled the shirts to school in a plastic bag.

As they stood in the foyer handing out the shirts, the bullied boy walked in. His face spoke volumes. 'It looked like a huge weight was lifted off his shoulders,' Mr. Price recalled.

The bullies were never heard from again."

What's Going On

Schools across B.C. are planning interesting things for their students on Pink Shirt Day; there will be assemblies, presentations, and student led activities. Many schools are encouraging their staff and students to wear pink shirts in support of anti-bullying initiatives.

  • Robert Ogilvie Elementary school in Fort St John celebrates Pink Shirt Day all February. Leadership students, RCMP liaison officers and guest speakers present at assemblies throughout the month. As well, the school has an extensive collection of bullying-themed library books and videos.
  • Six hundred students from four Surrey school district schools will be dancing to Michael Jackson and a popular Bollywood song in a flashmob on the grounds at Princess Margaret Secondary School.
  • Twin Rivers Education Centre in the Kamloops-Thompson school district is hosting a school-wide Wellness Fair with community health and wellness organizations who are setting up information booths for students and staff.
  • Students in Langley school district are creating Pink Shirt Day banners to use in a classroom exercise and hang in the school. As well, students are selling T-shirts with the message 'Stand Up – Don't Stand By.'
  • pinkshirtday.ca

2013 ERASE Bullying Public Service Announcement



2014 Bullying Awareness Day Proclamation

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If you are having thoughts of suicide or of hurting yourself or others, please reach out immediately for help. Call 9-1-1 (or your local police or authority, if you do not have 9-1-1) or go to your nearest hospital emergency room.

If you are being bullied, feeling alone or just need to talk to someone who will listen, please reach out to a trained volunteer or professional:



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