Everyone has a role to play

Bullying has a serious effect on children and youth, and must be dealt with. Preventing or dealing with bullying isn’t the responsibility of just one person – it takes a whole community approach. What’s important is that you understand what your role is, and how you can link with other supporters to help.

In this section, we’ll briefly explore the key players and what their role is in the ERASE Bullying strategy, and in ending violent behaviour between our students altogether.

The Students

Students must take responsibility for their own behaviour, and speak out when the rights or safety of others is at risk. They should not give bullies an audience. They should report incidents of bullying or harassment. They can stand up for their friends and speak out against bullying. They can reach out to an adult for support when they are being bullied, or witness the bullying or harassment of another student. They can get involved in their school by participating in student activities, and encourage others to do the same.

The Parents

Parents play a critical role in supporting their children and youth. They can teach their children about empathy and respect for others. They can teach them how to be assertive, not aggressive. They can create caring, respectful home environments and model positive behaviour. They can talk to their child without judgement. They can work with schools to find solutions to bullying and harassment.

The School Community

Schools, educators and Boards of Education set, communicate and consistently reinforce clear expectations of acceptable behaviour and hold students accountable for their actions. They can model and teach students about socially responsible behaviours. Schools in B.C. are striving to develop positive, welcoming school cultures and are committed to creating the right environment for learning. This means building a supportive, respectful and inclusive school culture; building support in the community, particularly for addressing safety concerns; understanding important issues like bullying, harassment, racism, sexism and homophobia, and learning the skills needed to respond to them. They are also responsible for setting and enforcing Codes of Conduct as set out by the Board of Education, which are essentially the principles, values, and rules that guide a school.

If you are having thoughts of suicide or of hurting yourself or others, please reach out immediately for help. Call 9-1-1 (or your local police or authority, if you do not have 9-1-1) or go to your nearest hospital emergency room.

If you are being bullied, feeling alone or just need to talk to someone who will listen, please reach out to a trained volunteer or professional:



Resources for Parents

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Resources for Youth

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Thank you for stopping by to check out the ERASE Bullying online reporting tool. This tool is accessible through computers and smart phones, and will allow students, parents or other witnesses to report bullying or other threatening behaviour, anytime and anywhere.

The online reporting tool has just been developed and is in the final stages of testing.

If you need help, please reach out to someone you trust, like a parent, friend or teacher. Or, you can reach out to someone who doesn’t know you for support. There is a list of youth-oriented support lines and websites on this site just for you.

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